Masala Dialogues of Hindi Films!

Mere paas ma hai! This morning, #Twitter is abuzz with ‘bhari bharkam’ cliched, melodramatic dialogues of Bollywood that were once created to inspire intense emotion, nostalgia and ardent admiration. But these days the audience get tickled and chuckle at the excesses! Replying to Tara Deshpande’s Tweet about sharing favorite Bollywood dialogues, #Twitterati reacted with enthusiasm. Sharing some of my all time favorites!

 

Those iconic dialogues are tadka of our masala films. Whistle, whistle and more whistles for these!!! Which is yours? (To read, what Twitterati has to say – go to @Tara_Deshpande

(Images courtesy Google)

Sridevi – My Muse

When I was a kid, Sridevi was my favourite face. The actress was everywhere – on magazine covers, newspapers and advertisements. And how I loved to draw her! My sketchbook had a lot of rough sketches of the beauty. She was an artist’s dream with large vivacious eyes and gorgeous demeanor. Her sudden, accidental death by drowning has left all her admirers in deep shock. Now, after so many years, I sketch her one last time as a tribute to her. #RIP Sridevi

A lady from 60s!

I have created this Indian lady keeping the stylish 60s in mind, when flamboyance, colours and exuberance dominated the silver screen. 

Hindi film actresses like Hema Malini, Saira Banu, Sadhana, Asha Parekh, Mumtaz, Sharmila Tagore went bolder and experimental with dress and make up during the era. Ladies extensively used winged eyeliners while beehives and fringe cut went on to be a rage. Old teen age pictures of our mothers say it all.

I have once again used pastel pencils and chalks here. As I worked on it continuously for about two hours, I felt I needed a lot of practice to understand the tricks and techniques for blending colours. Do you have any idea how to blend pastels?


Here is a black and white version of the same sketch after putting the charcoal effect through an app. Which one do you like better?

Who is the biggest film star in the world?

If you ask Google – Who is the biggest movie star in the world? Click comes the reply – “The numbers prove that Shah Rukh Khan is the biggest movie star in the world.” Whoa a desi!

We all know his life story – a nobody with a dream, comes to Mumbai to become an actor and eventually becomes the king of the Indian film industry. He did not stop at that – He is the biggest star in the world now!


The fact that he is a self made, hard working family man totally endears him to his fans. I have grown up binge watching his movies, applauding his scenes, defending him and knowing that – Shah Rukh Can! He is romance incarnate in Indian Movies.

From ‘Army’ and ‘Circus’ days when my mom used to exclaim – ‘Ye ladka hero banega'(This boy will be a film star  someday) to ‘Hello Zindagi’, he has come a long way.

Here are my coolest top 10 SRK movies.

  1. Chak de


2. Swades


3. Kabhi haan kabhi na


4. DDLJ


5. Rab ne bana di jodi


6. Chennai Express


7. Kal ho na ho


8. Raju ban gaya gentleman


9. Veer zara


10. Fan 


(Yeah, I liked Fan, despite all the criticism. I am yet to watch his newly released, Dear Zindagi, hence it is not in the list)

Recently, Netflix signed a deal with him in order to capture the coveted film market in India and stay one step ahead of rival Amazon. The charismatic Khan is not much known in the western world but the deal is sure to give him a wider exposure.

But meanwhile, we SRK fans are happy in the knowledge that he is the biggest movie star in the whole wide world with high grossing films, enviable film offers and a huge Twitter following. 

BTW, What is your favourite SRK film?

Images courtesy Google

The Exotic Nautch Girl


I first saw a nautch girl (dancer) when I was a little girl. We were at our mother’s village to attend a wedding and the nautch girl was standing in front of the community guest house.

She was ordinary looking but had a pleasant form. What made her special was the buzz surrounding her! Ladies were throwing scrutinizing glances at her while gents were checking her out through the corner of their eyes. Old ladies were chatting about beautiful baijis (another name for nautch girl) of their time. The arrival of the nautch girl had made the calm village a little noisy. She was considered a public woman, a fallen woman and everyone wanted to have a good look at her. But for me, she was exotic!


One of my relatives chided me for peeping at her. “She is not a good lady. Stay away from her. She is a nachaniya (another name for nautch girl). She dances and entertains the male crowd. Nice girls never go near her.” Her words made me all the more curious. And throughout the day, I kept a watch over the dancer through the window.

In the evening, I saw her washing her face and getting ready for the dance. We heard that groom and the baraat (group) had been received and were resting in the tents. I couldn’t wait to see her dance.

Well, at the auspicious time, the groom arrived with pomp and splendour. The nautch girl began to perform a welcome dance in front of the group. She had whiten her face, stained her teeth with betel and put on a lot of make up. Under bright lights, she looked younger than she actually was. The ladies watched the welcoming of the groom from the terrace while gents stood around her in a circle. Some young baraatis threw money at her which she pocketed fliratatiously.


I watched from above while she danced on and on…on that magical night. I forgot all about the wedding but her forbidden persona stayed with me.

It was later in life that I learnt more about the likes of her. I had almost forgotten about my exotic nautch girl when I came across this quote by James Forbes (Oriental Memoirs 1813)-

“Nautch girls are extremely delicate in their person, soft and regular in their features, with a form of perfect symmetry, and although dedicated from infancy to this profession, they in general preserve a decency and modesty in their demeanor, which is more likely to allure than the shameless effrontery of similar characters in other countries.”

I learnt that possibly my nautch girl was a crude and jaded version of the former nautch girls, who were superior in art and bearing. With time, during family functions, nautch girls got replaced by choreographed dancers.  And now we have DJs playing songs at every wedding.

Earlier, they were a prominent part of Indian life and culture during the second half of the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries. They were mostly teenage girls, who typically performed in Mughal courts, the palaces of nawabs, the mahals of rajas, the bungalows of officers of the British Raj, the houses of zamindars as well as at ordinary homes wherever they were invited. Sometimes they arrived with their troupe without any invitation to a celebration and patrons were expected to pay them. They would break into an impromptu dance whenever situation demanded.

It should be kept in mind that they were not into flesh trade and their husbands accompanied them as one of the musicians. Their dance forms were an amalgam of prevalent dance forms of India at that time.


As royalty faded, the tradition of nautch lost its lustre. Some of them joined films and theatre. They have been widely portrayed in films too. The prominent ones among them were Shashimukhi from Chitpur and Phanibala. Shashimukhi was the first recorded artist of India. She went on to become the tragedy queen of Bengal theatre. 

Further on, nautch girls lost their dignity and came to be seen primarily as sex workers. That is why my concerned relative had admonished me – “Nice girls never go near them”.

I do not know whether the nautch forms are still alive in some corner of India or not but I cannot help remembering that particular  nautch girl, who had looked so divine to me! I had followed her almost like a fan adores a film star. I had enjoyed her playfulness and dance moves. I did not know then that I was witnessing a fading tradition…

Images courtesy Google

Sadhana and Audrey Hepburn, look alikes?

 They say that there are seven look alikes in the world! Well, I cannot be really sure of the theory but one thing really struck me when I watched the iconic Audrey Hepburn in ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ – she looked very similar to our Indian film actress Sadhana.


The veteran Indian actress, passed away last night in India, leaving her fans and film industry in a state of shock. She was 74.

It is said that Audrey Hepburn’s hairstyle had inspired her popular fringe-cut. And just like her British predecesdor, the style diva revolutionised the Indian fashion scenario of 1960s. She was responsible for popularising churidaar-kurta, which is still a favourite with women in India.


Undoubtedly, both will be considered peerless beauties always. Here are some of the pictures of the beauties for you to compare. RIP Sadhana!




Images courtesy Google